Can My Cat Detect Cancer?

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As featured on curetoday.com

I know this might make me sound crazier than a crazy cat lady, but, I think my cat might be able to detect cancer.

Before someone orders a straight jacket to be sent to my house, let me explain….

In 2012 my cat started licking and eating the hair off her belly. Thinking she might have an allergy or an invisible strain of fleas, I took her to the vet. After several swipes of my Visa and many tests, the doctor ruled out any physical problem and told me he believed my cat had a mental disorder called Psychogenic Alopecia. Basically, the feline equivalent of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Instead of washing her hands a million times a day, she overgrooms. They sent me home with a version of kitty Xanax, which failed miserably. (Those of you who have ever tried to give a cat a pill understand.)

2012 is also when I began experiencing symptoms of Neuroendocrine Cancer. These initial symptoms of this rare, silent cancer included facial flushing, occasional heart palpitations, bloating and trouble digesting food.

After a couple years of my cat obsessively licking her belly and my symptoms increasing, eventually I became symptomatic enough to prompt my doctor to perform a myriad of tests. Neuroendocrine Cancer is often misdiagnosed for five to seven years, but I was “lucky” enough to be diagnosed with a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor a month after my first doctor’s visit. Weeks following the diagnosis, I had a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy and was sent home to recover without any additional treatment. My cat stopped licking her belly for a couple of months and then started again. Soon after some spots were found in my liver. And the cycle has repeated itself a few times. When all is well in my body, her overgrooming ceases and when something’s astray, the licking commences.

Could it be a coincidence? Sure, but if scientists are beginning to research dogs’ abilities to detect cancer, perhaps they should explore the secret power of cats as well. And should scientists accept my invitation, I know a certain tabby feline who would happily raise her soft, over-groomed paw in exchange for a couple servings of Fancy Feast.

Neuroendocrine Cancer (sometimes referred to as NET or Carcinoid Cancer) has the largest growing incident increase rate of all cancers. To learn more about this cancer and it’s symptoms, visit www.carcinoid.org.

Read my other articles with Cure.

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My own personal PET Scan

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Special Edition – Animals of Greece

To conclude the Greece series, I thought I would give you a visual treat.  While island hopping, I became slightly obsessed with taking photos of the adorable animals.  Actually my husband was pretty annoyed with it, but you can’t look at this slide show without being a little jealous of them.  Mark my words, when I am reincarnated, I want to come back as a cat or dog on the island of Santorini.

And, you’re welcome.

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